Felicia

Meet Felicia Perez, Development & Communications Intern

April 9, 2015

What is your name?

Felicia Perez.

 

So, what made you decide to intern with The LP? How does the internship relate to your studies?

I was planning on applying to either an internship opportunity with The Whitney Museum or The LP. The way I decided was by truly thinking about which program I would be able to relate to the most. The Whitney Museum is a great opportunity because it is popular, they are opening up their new location in Chelsea, and it is a great way to meet new people. However, The LP caught my attention the most because I can relate to the mission: “to amplify the creativity that already exists within communities by using arts and culture to build community networks…” If I were to create a manifesto for my future teaching career, it would without a doubt include most, if not all, of those words: community, culture, creativity, and identity. I want to teach my students the importance of playing a role in their community. I also want to teach them to embrace their culture in order to connect with their identity. This internship relates to my studies because it is helping me focus on what I truly believe in. I love that The LP uses art as a way to problem solve and strengthen community relations.

 

Do you have your own creative practice? If so, tell us more!

Since I am trying to become an art educator for secondary education, I must know a little bit of every kind of art practice. This is not to say that I do not have a personal preference—I do! I thoroughly enjoy making letters and sending them through regular mail. I like the idea of using stamps, quill pens and ink because it is a form of art that I feel is not used often anymore. I also really like performance arts because it reminds me that art does not have to mean using a paintbrush and paper.

 

Can you tell us about an artist or project that has inspired you?

One project that has inspired me is Waste Land by a Brazilian artist named Vik Muniz. I saw a documentary about his practice one day on Netflix and I can say that what I saw truly transformed me. In a nutshell, Muniz went to the largest trash city in Brazil, interviewed the workers living there and photographed those people who had very touching stories. He asked them to participate in his project which they all agreed to. They went to the place where the entire city deposits its trash and they collected pieces of garbage that seemed interesting. Finally, Muniz gathered all the garbage, projected each photograph in a huge loft and filled in the projection on the floor with the gathered trash. He then photographed the final product and had an exhibition where wealthy people were able to buy the photograph. The proceeds ended up going directly to the community who participated in the art making process. I was moved by this because he taught me there is beauty in waste, the importance of giving back, and most importantly the idea of incorporating the community into the art in order to remind those people that they matter in the world.

 

What is your favorite… film?

A few of my favorite films are 500 Days of Summer, Wolf of Wall Street, Silver Linings Playbook.

 

…album?

My favorite album is Lana Del Rey’s Born to Die.

 

…food?

My favorite food is authentic Italian because Italians have a simple way of cooking.

 

Where do you do your laundry?

I do laundry in my building’s laundry room (fun fact: I actually have to do laundry tonight).

 

In your opinion, why does art matter?

Art matters because it is the only subject that allows you to explore your culture and embrace your identity while building community, all at the same time.

 

Felicia is a student and artist studying Art Education at The City College of New York. She is particularly interested in making the middle and high school experience a positive one for all students.